New British naval tankers to be constructed with foreign steel

European and UK procurement rules appear to be blamed for sourcing of steel for new Royal Fleet Auxiliary tankers.

UK defence minister Philip Dunne said these regulations meant that the Ministry of Defence could not contractually mandate the use of particular suppliers after being asked about the TIDE Class Royal Fleet Auxiliary tankers.

The news comes amid thousands of jobs losses in the UK steel industry, which has come under pressure from a range of factors. The Royal Fleet Auxiliary is civilian manned and supports the Royal Navy, for example supplying ships on operations at sea with fuel.

Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron raised the issue of the use of British steel in the tankers through a written parliamentary question.

He said: “To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what (a) market value and (b) weight of UK steel has been used in the manufacture of the TIDE Class Royal Fleet Auxiliary tankers.”

In his response, Mr Dunne said: “Under European and UK procurement regulations, the Ministry of Defence (MOD) could not contractually mandate the use of particular suppliers.

“Decisions on the source of steel are a matter for the contractors who take into account the cost, timeliness of availability and the quality of steel used in defence contracts. These considerations allow defence contractors to deliver value for money for the taxpayer.”

“The Military Afloat Reach and Sustainability contract to build the four Tide Class tankers was awarded to Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering in March 2012.

“Although UK companies participated in the competition to supply the vessels, none submitted a final bid,” he added.

“In January 2015, the MOD awarded a contract worth approximately £15 million to A&P Group Ltd in the UK for the provision of UK customisation, Capability Assessment Trials and Support for all four tankers. The work will be managed by A&P Group Ltd’s Falmouth shipyard.

“Manufacture of the four Tide Class tankers will in total require 44,000 tonnes of steel. Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering source this steel locally in South Korea. The market value of steel depends upon a number of factors, including geographical location and quality.

“The MOD does not hold information from which the market value of the steel used in the manufacture of the Tide Class tankers could be determined.”

(Photo: Port talbot large by Grubb at English Wikipedia)

MORE STORIES – CLICK BELOW

512px-Redcar_Steelworks_at_Night

UK government insists it’s pressing the EU commission over steel dumping…

Assembling_The_Engine_clip_art_hight

Brits no longer own majority of UK-based manufacturers with 500+ employees

Train_clip_art_hight

EU backs UK’s HS2 high-speed rail network with hard cash

Earth_within_celestial_sphere

Royal Navy still trains officers to navigate by the stars

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “New British naval tankers to be constructed with foreign steel”

  1. So the availability local to the manufacturer of steel supply is the main factor after price? I can’t imagine the French or German Navies ordering ships to be built any other place than at French or German shipyards, AM I WRONG? (So in those cases, LOCALLY produced steel would be imperative too? I see very few public service vehicles, police-cars, ambulances etc. which are ‘made in Britain’ BUT I CANNOT IMAGINE OTHER E.U.COUNTRIES ORDERING OTHER VEHICLES THAN ‘HOME-MADE’!
    But THEY make the rules for US to follow (not themselves!)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s